Patrick Mahomes: Why The New Chiefs Quarterback Will Thrive In The NFL

Patrick Mahomes

In Week 2 of the NFL Preseason, Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes dropped back to pass, avoided pressure in the pocket, stepped up, and threw the ball 70 yards in the air to a streaking Tyreek Hill for the touchdown.

Patrick Mahomes is going to be a stud.

70-yard throws do not guarantee Super Bowls, but that throw is precisely what the Chiefs have been missing the past few years with Alex Smith. To his defense, Alex Smith was no slouch. During his tenure, Smith brought the Chiefs to the playoffs in four out of five seasons and made two Pro Bowls. Smith also went almost two years without throwing a touchdown to a receiver and never brought the team past the Divisional Round.

Just like the Toronto Raptors shook up their roster after a successful season in the NBA, the Chiefs decided to do the same thing and trade Smith to the Redskins. The Patrick Mahomes era is set to begin on Sunday. There is a reason why the Chiefs traded three draft picks to select Mahomes. The Texas Tech product was known for his big arm and ability to make all of the throws, which culminated in a 734-passing-yard performance against Oklahoma. Mahomes has a gun-slinger mentality, which has drawn comparisons to Brett Favre. 

Via Bleacher Report

The Guru

If there is one coach who knows how to evaluate quarterbacks, it’s Andy Reid. Reid drafted Donovan McNabb who, despite being met with a chorus of boos at the 1999 NFL Draft, became a 6-time Pro Bowler and led Reid to his only Super Bowl appearance. In Week 2 in 2010, Reid turned the reigns over to an aging Michael Vick, who was looking for a second chance after spending time in prison. Vick leads the Eagles to the playoffs and won the Comeback Player of the Year. Finally, Reid brought in Alex Smith when he went to the Chiefs and Smith lead the team to the playoffs in 4 of 5 years. The track record speaks for itself. Andy Reid knows a thing or two about quarterbacks.

Patrick Mahomes takes over for a team that has Super Bowl talent but has failed to put it all together. It’s not like Mahomes is going to a team under a rebuild like Josh Allen and the Bills or Baker Mayfield and the Browns. The Chiefs are a legitimate team that has competed for the AFC West title the last five seasons. Mahomes will look to excite fans with his rocket arm and a plethora of weapons like Hill, Kareem Hunt, and Travis Kelce.

ESPN NFL Analyst Louis Riddick said, “I would take Patrick Mahomes over just about any quarterback in this list. I would stack him up against anyone.  Furthermore, I think Mahomes is going to absolutely set the league on fire next year. Andy Reid is on to something down there in Kansas City.”

If Mahomes lives up to the hype, fans in Kansas City will have something to cheer about for years to come.

Colin Kaepernick and Nike – Did Nike Just Do It or Just Blew It

Colin Kaepernick

Nike almost broke Twitter when it announced that Colin Kaepernick would be the face of their 30th anniversary “Just Do it” Campaign. It has been a polarizing debate that has lingered on for days. Everyone has their opinion about the health and future of the NFL, Kaepernick, and Nike. That debate will continue as the Nike ads will start running Thursday during the NFL’s Falcons-Eagles Kickoff game. I am here to provide facts and insight on the situation.

Social responsibility, protests, and action are the American way. This country was founded on protest. However, evidence shows that protests are largely ineffective unless they disrupt the everyday lives of people. So, a Twitter protest is just a social media protest that will affect people’s buying habits for days, not months or years. In the last year, people have tried to boycott Chick-fil-a, In-N-Out, Starbucks, and the NFL. All have gone on to make more money.

Nike Just Blew It

Is having Kaepernick on the face of the campaign “bad for business”? Did Nike really alienate half its customer base? Twitter business prognosticators and an angry mob would have you believe that’s true.

The facts are that half of Nike’s nearly $36 billion of revenue in 2017 comes from overseas. And 2/3 of all Nike customers are 35 or under. So while they did piss off a specific demographic, in all likelihood they aren’t Nike’s core customers anyway. NIKE absolutely dominates the sports footwear market. And has recovered the 5.5% of its market share of US footwear it lost to Adidas in 2017.

Nike spends millions on research every year. So, choosing Kaepernick to be the face of the campaign was a very calculated decision. The company was built on rebellion and bucking the system, and Kaepernick falls right in line with that. Michael Jordan and Steve Prefontaine are Nike’s cornerstone athletes. Both bucked the system. Pre was an eccentric runner who bucked the norms. Jordan’s shoes were banned by the NFL, but he continued to wear them. Nike rebelled and took a chance on a black athlete as their pitchman in the 80s. Most companies believed it to be a risky business. We see how that turned out.

Nike’s Stock is Getting Killed

Many people believed that Nike’s stock would drop significantly and it would hurt the business. They thought that “protesters” would abandon a well-performing stock to prove a point. Well, that has shown to false so far. Nike’s stock closed at $82.18 per share on Friday, Aug. 31st.  Nike made the announcement on Labor Day when the markets were not open. By the close of Tuesday Nike’s stock was down $3 to $79.01. On Thursday, September 6th (NKE) closed at $80.40 per share. So yes, Nike’s stock is down $1.78 since the Kaepernick campaign announcement, but it appeared to be normal market fluctuation. On September 11th, the stock price reached as high as $83.57. which is the highest it has ever been. Here is Nike’s last year on the market:

Colin Kaepernick and Nike

NFL will drop Nike

The Twitter mob would have you believe that the NFL may end their relationship with Nike.

Nike is bigger and badder than the NFL. There is ZERO chance the NFL takes legal steps to remove Nike as their official apparel provider. Nike and the NFL are in the midst of an apparel contract that was just extended to 2028. It would likely cost the NFL billions in damages if they breached the contract. The thought that the NFL was blindsided by the Colin Kaepernick signing is doubtful. The league may not have had much advance notice about it, but they have known for much longer than we know. The evidence lies in the NFL’s response to Nike’s campaign, and in the league suspending any consequences to players kneeling.

The NFL responded by saying:

“The National Football League believes in dialogue, understanding and unity,” executive vice president of communications and public affairs Jocelyn Moore said in the league’s statement. “We embrace the role and responsibility of everyone involved with this game to promote meaningful, positive change in our communities. The social justice issues that Colin and other professional athletes have raised deserve our attention and action.”

There will be some angry owners, but they will get over it. The smartest thing the NFL can do is take a page out of the NBA’s playbook. Stay out of litigation and public discord with your players. Let your players be individuals free to say and do as they please. Fans want their players on the field, not in the courtroom fighting the league.

The owners also have realized that despite what the POTUS or some of the media tell you NFL revenues and total viewership is up despite falling ratings. Nearly all television network ratings have dropped at a much higher rate than NFL game ratings. Antiquated Nielsen ratings are the biggest factor in the decrease in ratings while total viewership has increased. Those ratings do not account for “cord cutters” and people who watch games through streaming services like Amazon, Hulu TV, YouTube TV, Sling, Roku, etc.

Colleges will drop Nike

There is a faction of people who believe that universities like Alabama, Oregon, or Florida would consider dropping Nike.

There is ZERO chance that happens as well.

“Schools can’t stop any of them: Nike, Under Armour, Adidas,” said David Carter, executive director of USC’s Sports Business Institute. “They don’t have the contractual ability to do that.”

Aside from having no legal ground to void their deals, what alternative do schools have? Nike writes the biggest checks and sells the most merchandise, which handsomely increases these universities bottom line. And we all know that the NCAA always protects the bottom line before the student-athlete.

Breaking Away From Nike

I conducted a poll on Twitter. Thanks to all those who voted and shared. Reading the comments on this poll was fascinating. There were a lot of “let’s rock the vote” comments going on, which only proves my point about Twitter boycotts. They trend, but rarely result in a significant economic impact.

How can a sports fan realistically #BoycottNike? It’s impossible. Nike is the official apparel company for the NFL, NBA, most college basketball teams, and 52.8% of all FBS college football programs. So, if you want to rep your favorite team, you will be giving Nike some cash. And you will absolutely see plenty of swooshes and commercials as you watch the games. Nike also owns Converse and Hurley as well. So, good luck with that.

It is your right to hate or love Nike for signing Kaepernick. However, you have no soul if you hate this commercial.

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*Updated Sept. 11th 10:26 am pt to reflect Nike’s YTD stock price

Bob Wylie Continues to Steal the Show on HBO’s Hard Knocks

Let me start by saying this. I have no idea how many games the Cleveland Browns will win this year. I have no idea when Baker Mayfield will replace Tyrod Taylor as the starting quarterback.

However, I do know one thing. Bob Wylie is a star.

For the first time in awhile, the Cleveland Browns are a major story in the NFL thanks to Hard Knocks, a reality-sports television program on HBO that chronicles an NFL team in training camp. Teams like the Miami Dolphins, Houston Texans, and New York Jets have been featured on the program. This year, the Browns were chosen to be the featured team. The offseason has been full of promise despite not winning a game last year. With the additions of Tyrod Taylor, Jarvis Landry, and Baker Mayfield to go along with the return of Josh Gordon, the overall sentiment is that the Browns are on the upswing.

However, all of those storylines have taken a back seat to Mr. Electricity himself, Bob Wylie. Wylie is 67 years old and the current Browns offensive line coach. Wylie is old school to a T. He’s honest, in-your-face, and just loves the game of football. Wylie probably has no idea what an iPhone is and definitely watches the 6 o’clock news every night. He’s your cool drunk Uncle at a wedding that could make a tree talk. That’s how entertaining Wylie has been.

Last episode, Wylie went on a rant about stretching and somehow he made a comparison to soldiers storming the beaches at Normandy.

Laugh out loud funny. Wylie is a true football guy. He eats, sleeps, and breathes football. Fancy stretching? Take a hike. The jokes didn’t stop there as Wylie paid homage to Ferris Bueller. Oh, he also drives a white maserati because kings do king things.

I’m in tears watching his gut synchronized to the snap count.

Did I mention that Wylie is a MAGICIAN?

If the Browns make the playoffs this year, it will be because of Bob Wylie. Hopefully, when Hard Knocks is finished, HBO decides to follow Bob Wylie for the rest of the year. The world needs it.

Follow me on Twitter @danny_giro.

Dolphins National Anthem Policy FAIL: Wrighster Or Wrong

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Dolphins owner Stephen Ross submitted a new team national anthem policy that would suspend players for up to 4 games. The NFL and NFLPA saved him from this ridiculousness by putting an indefinite halt on any policies surrounding the national anthem including the one the league put in place. That policy stated that players must either stand respectfully for the national anthem or remain in the locker room. Finally, the NFL owners recognize that this so-called “outrage” about the anthem has not affected the one thing they care about the most, their MONEY. League revenues are up despite tv ratings being down 10% and a general negative perseption by fans about how the league has handled many issues. I detailed the reasons behind ratings decline and that they are not nearly as big of a deal as is made to believe.

It is always worth noting that the NFL didn’t even have players outside of the locker room for the national anthem until the Department of Defense started cutting the league two comma checks.

The absurdity that a player would get the exact same punishment for kneeling as steroids and PEDs is outrageous. Players get a 6-game suspension for domestic abuse. Jameis Winston just got a 3-game suspension for gropping an UBER driver. I refuse to believe this type of math makes sense to anyone.

Am I Wrighster or am I Wrong?